About Fuji


Conquer Your Mountain

Fuji's logo and "Conquer Your Mountain" tagline is a call to action for riders, retailers and all fans of Fuji. "Your Mountain" doesn't just stand for the climb you face on your weekly ride; it's any obstacle that stands in your way.

Fuji seeks to motivate its riders to confront and overcome their daily obstacles — whether it's attaining fitness goals, living a greener lifestyle or, quite literally, climbing cycling's most notorious mountain passes.


Fuji Is Proud Of

Our Heritage

1899

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Founded in Japan as Nichibei Fuji, the company starts importing American and English bikes. The word ‘Nichibei’ translates as ‘Japanese-American.’ Within 20 years the company starts manufacturing its own bicycles in Japan.

1919

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Nichibei-Fuji begins exporting Fuji-branded bikes from Japan throughout Asia.

1920s

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Fuji is Japan’s most popular bicycle brand and is winning races in Japanese cycling competitions.

1930s

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Fuji establishes the first national stage race from Osaka to Tokyo. The “Tour of Japan” continues today as an UCI Asia Tour race and includes a stage up Fuji Bike’s namesake — Mt. Fuji.

1950s

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Toshoku America, Inc. is formed and acquires exclusive distribution rights for Fuji-manufactured bicycles in the U.S.

1951

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Nichibei-Fuji earns its first international victory when Shoichiro Sugihara wins the road race in the First Asian Games in New Delhi, India.

1950s & 1960s

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Fuji manufactured bicycles are sold under house-brand names to major retailers in the U.S. like Sears & Roebuck.

1970s

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The Fuji S10-S single-handedly establishes Fuji as a premium brand in the U.S.

1970s

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Fuji is first to introduce a Shimano Dura Ace production bike — the Fuji Ace — to the U.S. market.

1970s

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Fuji introduces the first 12-speed featuring a 6-speed freewheel— a revelation in the cycling industry.

1971

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Fuji America is the first Japanese brand in the history of American cycling to market itself under its own name and be distributed across the U.S. from its New York City headquarters. With innovations like lighter chromoly frames, Fuji’s reputation for quality bicycles soars.

1974

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Fuji sponsors first U.S. Women’s National Cycling Team — 10 years before women’s cycling became an Olympic sport — and is the first brand to sponsor a professional women’s cycling team in North America — Fuji Suntour. Fuji is the longest-continuing bike brand to sponsor women’s cycling.

1980s

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Fuji develops a series of beloved, high-quality touring bicycles.

1985

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Fuji sponsors Mark Gorski, 1984 Olympic gold medalist, to ride for Fuji’s elite racing team.

1986

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Fuji is one of the first companies to manufacture bicycle frames made of titanium.

1998

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Advanced Sports, Inc. forms to purchase Fuji America as well as the worldwide distribution rights to the Fuji bicycle brand. At this time, Fuji bicycles were only being sold in the U.S. and Japan.

1999

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The Mercury pro cycling team earns more than 70 victories on the Fuji Team Issue bike, becoming the top U.S. pro men’s team.

2003

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The women’s-specific Fuji Roubaix wins Bicycling Magazine Editor’s Top Choice Award.

2004

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Fuji releases its first full-carbon road bike, upon which Judith Arndt becomes the first woman to win a Road Race World Championship aboard a carbon-fiber bike.

2005

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Regina Schleicher wins the Women’s Road Race World Championships on a Fuji.

2008

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Fuji introduces the brand-redefining D-6 time-trial bike, opening the door to the world of triathlon.

2010

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Fuji makes its debut at the Tour de France with Fuji-sponsored pro team Footon-Servetto.

2011

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Aboard a Fuji team Geox-TMC bike, Juan Jose Cobo wins the Vuelta a España.

2011 & 2012

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Annika Langvad wins two consecutive Mountain Bike Marathon World Championships riding a Fuji.

2014

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Fuji races in yet another Tour de France with it lightest bike at that point in the brand’s history — the Altamira SL — with team NetApp-Endura.

2015

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The Fuji Transonic model wins the King of The Mountain competition in the 2015 Vuelta a Espana, the most-difficult climbing competition of the year.

Today

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Fuji is one of the top-four brands sold through the specialty bicycle retail channel in the USA and is distributed in more than 100 markets worldwide.

The Racing Legend Continues

Fuji's success is based upon an innovative research-and-design process that allows the brand to develop products based on the performance needs of its sponsored professional athletes and then apply that technology to every type of ride. Fuji brings together engineers, mechanics and pro riders utilizing the racing arena as a laboratory for developing world-class bikes at the leading edge of technology. Each bike that Fuji creates goes through years of conceptual work, prototype building and testing before ever reaching a consumer.

We’re a century’s-old company and when it comes to making bikes that’s a long time. For us, it’s not about the number of years it’s about what we can say as a result of each of those years. When we talk to riders of all types, we hear the same thing: “My first bike was a Fuji.”
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Exceeds Expectations

Bikes are personal machines, and every bike fits a different need for a different type of rider. A Fuji will exceed your expectations of quality and performance. If it didn’t, we wouldn’t build the bike.


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State-Of-The-Art

Part of our responsibility as a leading bike brand is to contribute to the ongoing evolution of our sport. We’re committed to releasing innovative products that help our customers perform better.